10 Awesome Handwriting Apps for Your iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Digital immigrants (Ed. – hate that description) are still trying to come to grips with all the digital innovations that are unfolding in today’s world. And even for those who have succeeded in making the digital transition, they still have an urge for the old days of pen and paper practices. That is probably why even with the prevalence of touch screen devices, some people still prefer to use a stylus when working on their tablets. While stylus does satisfy the craving for holding a pen in your hand, it still does not function as expected.

English: Apple iPad Event
English: Apple iPad Event (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So if you are one of those people who like to use their fingers to take notes on iPad, the list below will be of great help to you. I have curated several useful apps that will allow you to experiment with your handwriting right on your iPad screen.

via 10 Awesome Handwriting Apps for Your iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning.

Why you should turn off push notifications right now | @WiredUK

Most students believe that they can study effectively whilst simultaneously watching TV, checking Facebook and responding to every ridiculous interruption that appears on their phone.

They can’t.

We live in an age of interruption. Ping – you have a text message. Ping – you have a new email. Ping – you have a Facebook friend request. Ping – you have a match on your online dating app. Ping-ping-ping, all day long.

A recent Gallup poll found that more than 50 per cent of Americans who own smartphones keep their phone near them “almost all the time during waking hours”. Over 50 per cent say check their smartphone at least several times an hour and 11 per cent say they check it every few minutes. And that’s just what they’re aware of and admit to – I would not be surprised if the real frequency and intensity is much higher.

Until relatively recently in our technological history we did not have a lot of content coming to our devices. Now, we have texts, all kind of notifications and what seems like an endless stream of both personal and work emails. And it’s not just our phones. How many times have you been at your computer working on something when you get an email notification? And of those instances, how often did you stop what you’re doing to look at your email, realised that it was not that important and returned to your work – after taking a few minutes to remind yourself where you were and what your train of thought was?

At this point, it should be painfully clear to everyone that we need to be worried about the interruptions economy. What value do interruptions provide, under what conditions, and what are their costs? A little ping may seem innocuous, but there is cumulating evidence that the cost of an interruption is higher than we realise, and of course given the sheer number of interruptions, their combined effect can very quickly become substantial.

Source: Why you should turn off push notifications right now

How to write a novel: 6 writing apps & inspiration apps – @MacworldUK

This article from Macworld is focused on writing novels but is just as helpful if you are writing any medium to long form piece.

6 writing apps for iPhone, iPad and Mac that will help you start writing your novel and stay inspired until it’s finished

Source: How to write a novel: 6 writing apps & inspiration apps – Features – Macworld UK

The secret to finding high quality educational iOS apps – EduBloggery

Mac App Store
Mac App Store (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you’re looking to spread your digital wings a bit, you probably want to find some of the highest quality educational iOS apps available. You probably head over to the official Apple App Store on your chosen iDevice and check out the ‘featured’ area and perhaps the ‘Top Sellers’ list. That’s great and a solid way to see what is being used on devices around the world.

For the most part, though, all those top apps are either just big names or have had some recent promotion. As someone who once made an iPad app, I know what it’s like to try and get your app onto one of those promoted areas in the App Store. You would do just about anything because, as I found out, your sales and download numbers skyrocket as soon as you crack the top 100 apps in your category.

So how should you avoid the crazy featured and top sellers lists? By becoming familiar with the category filters, of course!

via The secret to finding high quality educational iOS apps – EduBloggery.

Building more beautiful Line of Business apps using LightSwitch – MSDN UK Team blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

The Microsoft Visual Studio .NET logo.
The Microsoft Visual Studio .NET logo. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We talk a lot about building and designing consumer apps but what about line of business apps?

The new features in Visual Studio LightSwitch are designed to help you build beautiful, mobile business productivity apps without having to write a lot of code. You can create SharePoint apps and HTML5 client apps – the LightSwitch templates provide the fit and finish so you can get your app up and running pretty quickly and WPF, Silverlight and SketchFlow to Blend for Visual Studio have recently been added to the toolset.

LightSwitch HTML clients are built on standards-compliant HTML5 and JavaScript and provide touch-first experiences on Windows RT, Windows Phone 8, iPhones and iPads with iOS 5 and 6, and Android 4.x devices.

via Building more beautiful Line of Business apps using LightSwitch – MSDN UK Team blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs.

Developing iOS 7 Apps for iPhone and iPad | Stanford Online

Image representing iPhone as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase

Developing iOS 7 Apps for iPhone and iPad | Stanford Online.

Updated for iOS 7. Tools and APIs required to build applications for the iPhone and iPad platform using the iOS SDK. User interface designs for mobile devices and unique user interactions using multi-touch technologies. Object-oriented design using model-view-controller paradigm, memory management, Objective-C programming language. Other topics include: object-oriented database API, animation, multi-threading and performance considerations. 

5 Education Apps That Don’t Exist (But Should) | Edudemic

My iPhone apps as of February 2010
My iPhone apps as of February 2010 (Photo credit: dougbelshaw)

Having been teaching with a tablet in my classroom for nearly a year it has become evident that the market for Education apps still isn’t quite right. I think this is most evident in the fact that the course I run training teachers to use an iPad effectively in the classroom features almost no ‘education’ apps. I do one session (out of 7) that revolves around subject-specific apps, but other than this, the apps that are used on a day-to-day basis are commercial, and often free.

That said, even these great apps, that no doubt you read about all the time – Evernote, Dropbox, iMovie etc, don’t do everything we need them to do.

The key to successful technology integration in schools is to get the staff on board. To get the staff on board, you need to show them how much easier life becomes with the technology, as well as how much better/enhanced the learning can be. There will always be a core group of teachers who get on board without much fuss and these people are what keep you sane when you’re trying to push things forward. I will discuss the role of ‘champions’ in a future post.

Back to what we need to get devices functioning at a higher level in a classroom. My wish list includes the following:

via 5 Education Apps That Don’t Exist (But Should) | Edudemic.

12 Ways To Integrate (Not Just Use) Technology In Education #yam

Image representing iPad as depicted in CrunchBase
Image via CrunchBase

There are a couple dozen ways to ‘use’ technology in education. There are also a couple dozen ways to integrate technology in education. Think those two things are the same? Think that throwing a few iPads and a few Edudemic blog posts into a classroom is the best way to launch a 1:1 initiative? In case you couldn’t guess, it’s not. So here’s a hypothetical to clear up my rhetorical questions even more:

via 12 Ways To Integrate (Not Just Use) Technology In Education.

‘Our School Would Be Better Off Without iPads.’ | Edudemic

English: iPads can be a distraction to learning
English: iPads can be a distraction to learning (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We go on and on about iPads, tablets, phablets, and just about every other piece of technology out there. But the discussion is slowly changing. It’s becoming less and less about how to deploy as much technology as possible. Instead, the discussion is shifting (luckily) back over to effectively connecting with students. Check out the recent post by George Couros to see what I’m talking about. It’s easy to see that there is a slow pivot happening in education right now where we’re becoming a little less enamored by shiny new iGadgets and other tech tools. Instead, we want to figure out how to effectively use what we have in order to actually connect with students.

So that’s why it was interesting to see a comment pop up on a recent post here on Edudemic about iPads. In that post, someone who wrote as ‘student 21′ pointed out the problem of deploying iPads in school. They’re not always effectively used. This goes for iPads as much as any other learning resource (electronic or not). It’s all in how the device is used.

via ‘Our School Would Be Better Off Without iPads.’ | Edudemic.

Read the original article for the details.

6 Ways Students Can Collaborate With iPads – from Greg on @Edudemic #yam

Image representing iPad as depicted in CrunchBase
Image via CrunchBase

The app store is loaded with options that allow students to create content on their iPads. From comic strip creators to mind maps, video editing and publishing, screencasting & digital books, the options for individual student creation are expanding.

However, collaboration between students is often a critical component of any classroom activity or project and increasingly there are options available that allow for collaborative efforts across iPads.

Below are six ways to support collaboration between student iPads that cover the spectrum of creation options that range from text to digital storytelling to video creation.

via 6 Ways Students Can Collaborate With iPads – from Greg on Edudemic | Leading Change in Changing Times.