The Death of Lecture – YouTube

For more than a thousand years, students have been gathering in lecture halls to listen to the “sage on the stage.” But shorter attention spans, new technologies, and empirical testing of learning outcomes have led us to question the tried and true historical “transmission” model of education. In this episode, Ken Steele gives a brief lecture on “the Death of Lecture.” Check out how familiar a 14th-century lecture hall at the Universite di Bologne looks. Former Quest University president David Helfand ex

10 Trends That Are Reshaping EdTech – The Edvocate

Trend usually implies that something is short term, like a one-hit wonder on the radio, but when we talk about educational technology, these trends are here to not only stay, but grow. While it is hard to choose the most important educational technology trends, we did our best to craft this list of ten.

Source: 10 Trends That Are Reshaping EdTech – The Edvocate

Beyond the National Student Survey – Student Experience Company @SXManagement

Our White Paper, “Beyond the National Student Survey” outlines key principles for improving student experience. It:

Summarises the changes and discontinuities that are shaping student experience expectations.

Overviews the changes contained in the Government White Paper, “Success as a Knowledge Economy“.

Outlines ten significant problems of the National Student Survey.

Defines six key principles for defining and managing student experience.

Source: Beyond the National Student Survey – Student Experience Company

What’s next for edtech? | University Business

 

Deutsch: Logo University of the West of Scotland
Deutsch: Logo University of the West of Scotland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At the request of Microsoft I wrote a small piece for University Business on the future of educational technology. You can read it by following the link.

UK HE is placing a higher priority on attracting international students than ever before. Indeed, my own institution, the University of the West of Scotland, has recently been rated as amongst the top 5% of universities worldwide. While this is an exciting development it also comes with its own challenges including tailoring teaching, research and the university’s procedures to ensure a fulfilling experience. Enabling all of this is the underpinning technical infrastructure.

Source: What’s next for edtech? | University Business

To-Do Lists Don’t Work – Daniel Markovitz – Harvard Business Review

Stop making to-do lists. They’re simply setting you up for failure and frustration. Consider the to-do lists you’re currently managing: how many items have been languishing since Michelle Bachman was leading the field for the Republican nomination? How often do you scan your list just so that you can pick off the ones you can finish in two minutes? How many items aren’t really to-dos at all, but rather serious projects that require significant planning?

There are five fundamental problems with to-do lists that render them ineffective.

via To-Do Lists Don’t Work – Daniel Markovitz – Harvard Business Review.

4 Ways To Improve School Communication Using Social Media – Edudemic #yammer

A segment of a social network
A segment of a social network (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4 Ways To Improve School Communication Using Social Media – Edudemic.

5 Education Apps That Don’t Exist (But Should) | Edudemic

My iPhone apps as of February 2010
My iPhone apps as of February 2010 (Photo credit: dougbelshaw)

Having been teaching with a tablet in my classroom for nearly a year it has become evident that the market for Education apps still isn’t quite right. I think this is most evident in the fact that the course I run training teachers to use an iPad effectively in the classroom features almost no ‘education’ apps. I do one session (out of 7) that revolves around subject-specific apps, but other than this, the apps that are used on a day-to-day basis are commercial, and often free.

That said, even these great apps, that no doubt you read about all the time – Evernote, Dropbox, iMovie etc, don’t do everything we need them to do.

The key to successful technology integration in schools is to get the staff on board. To get the staff on board, you need to show them how much easier life becomes with the technology, as well as how much better/enhanced the learning can be. There will always be a core group of teachers who get on board without much fuss and these people are what keep you sane when you’re trying to push things forward. I will discuss the role of ‘champions’ in a future post.

Back to what we need to get devices functioning at a higher level in a classroom. My wish list includes the following:

via 5 Education Apps That Don’t Exist (But Should) | Edudemic.

12 Ways To Integrate (Not Just Use) Technology In Education #yam

Image representing iPad as depicted in CrunchBase
Image via CrunchBase

There are a couple dozen ways to ‘use’ technology in education. There are also a couple dozen ways to integrate technology in education. Think those two things are the same? Think that throwing a few iPads and a few Edudemic blog posts into a classroom is the best way to launch a 1:1 initiative? In case you couldn’t guess, it’s not. So here’s a hypothetical to clear up my rhetorical questions even more:

via 12 Ways To Integrate (Not Just Use) Technology In Education.

5 Tips For Hosting Online Class Discussions | Edudemic

Students of Saint Mary's Hall
Students of Saint Mary’s Hall (Photo credit: Robert of Fairfax)

Class discussions that can occur any time of day and students engaged in that discussion. It took me a while to get my head around ‘online’ discussion and I used the experience of other teachers in my school who’d tried it. I currently use this with my Independent Directed Study students (Japanese language) and will be expanding it to my Year 4 students next year. What to consider? Here’s a few of my thoughts:

via 5 Tips For Hosting Online Class Discussions | Edudemic.

What To Know About The Accreditation Of MOOCs And Online Learning

The increasing numbers of students opting to enroll with an online learning institution, combined with the continual evolution of the digital age, has prompted professionals within higher education to address the effect of this growth on accreditation.For centuries, educational accreditation has provided a quality assurance usually by way of governmental or semi-governmental organizations. If a college or university has an accredited status, the qualifications it awards its students are deemed to be fit and proper by potential employers. Critics of this tradition have pointed to escalating tuition fees as a primary cause for disenfranchising middle-class and working class students. These learners, therefore, may be more likely to pursue a course in distance education as it is more financially viable, despite the fact that some of these universities and colleges possess an unaccredited tag.

education
education (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

At a recent Stanford forum, NYU Education and Sociology professor Richard Arum, even raised the call for the pressing need for educational reform, and for the overall re-appraisal of accreditation standards.

via What To Know About The Accreditation Of MOOCs And Online Learning.