Googles Coder tool turns Raspberry Pi into a mini web server | ZDNet

English: Extract from Raspberry Pi board at Tr...
English: Extract from Raspberry Pi board at TransferSummit 2011 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Google has released Coder, a free open source tool to make it easier to use Raspberry Pi mini-computers to build for the web.

Hatched by Google Creative Lab creative technologist Jason Striegel, designer Jeff Baxter, and a small team in New York, Coder offers a stepping stone for people interested in building for the web by converting cheap Raspberry Pi mini-computers into personal web servers through a stripped-back web-based development environment.

Google’s pitching Coder at an education audience, a potential sweet spot for Raspberry Pi given its $35 price tag and one Google has focused on previously, gifting 15,000 of the devices to UK schools earlier this year. Raspberry Pi supporters in the UK have also been urging schools to use the devices to spur interest in coding, hacking and building.

via Googles Coder tool turns Raspberry Pi into a mini web server | ZDNet.

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UC Berkeley Is Offering Data Science, Its Fastest-Growing Course Ever, for Free Online | Open Culture

Univerity of California, Berkeley logo
Univerity of California, Berkeley logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s worth passing along a message from UC Berkeley. According to its news service, the “fastest-growing course in UC Berkeley’s history — Foundations of Data Science [aka Data 8X] — is being offered free online this spring for the first time through the campus’s online education hub, edX.” More than 1,000 students are now taking the course each semester at the university.

Designed for students who have not previously taken statistics or computer science courses, Foundations of Data Science will teach you in a three-course sequence “how to combine data with Python programming skills to ask questions and explore problems that you encounter in any field of study, in a future job, and even in everyday life.”

Source: UC Berkeley Is Offering Data Science, Its Fastest-Growing Course Ever, for Free Online | Open Culture

Cognitive bias cheat sheet

Systemic bias venn diagram.
Systemic bias venn diagram. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’ve spent many years referencing Wikipedia’s list of cognitive biases whenever I have a hunch that a certain type of thinking is an official bias but I can’t recall the name or details. It’s been an invaluable reference for helping me identify the hidden flaws in my own thinking. Nothing else I’ve come across seems to be both as comprehensive and as succinct.

However, honestly, the Wikipedia page is a bit of a tangled mess. Despite trying to absorb the information of this page many times over the years, very little of it seems to stick. I often scan it and feel like I’m not able to find the bias I’m looking for, and then quickly forget what I’ve learned. I think this has to do with how the page has organically evolved over the years. Today, it groups 175 biases into vague categories (decision-making biases, social biases, memory errors, etc) that don’t really feel mutually exclusive to me, and then lists them alphabetically within categories. There are duplicates a-plenty, and many similar biases with different names, scattered willy-nilly.

I’ve taken some time over the last four weeks (I’m on paternity leave) to try to more deeply absorb and understand this list, and to try to come up with a simpler, clearer organizing structure to hang these biases off of. Reading deeply about various biases has given my brain something to chew on while I bounce little Louie to sleep.

Source: Cognitive bias cheat sheet

Assessing the Assessments: Development of a Tool To Evaluate Assessment Items According to Learning Outcomes | Simon B Bedford and Glennys O’Brien – Academia.edu

Assessing the Assessments: Development of a Tool To Evaluate Assessment Items According to Learning Outcomes

Source: Assessing the Assessments: Development of a Tool To Evaluate Assessment Items According to Learning Outcomes | Simon B Bedford and Glennys O’Brien – Academia.edu

Why girls are put off studying computer science

Despite the phenomenal rise in computing over the last 50 years, the birth of the internet, and our ever increasing reliance on technology, women are still not engaging with computer science at the same rate as men.

This has been outlined in a recent report from the University of Roehampton, which reveals that only 9% of girls schools offer computing at A-level, compared with 44% of boys schools, and 25% of mixed-sex sixth forms and colleges.

The report shows that in 2016 only a minority of schools (29%) entered pupils for GCSE computing – despite it being a foundation subject on the national curriculum. The figure is even lower at A-level, with only 24% of schools entering their students for the qualification.

Things don’t fair any better in further education either, with the Digest of Education statistics revealing the percentage of females who took an undergraduate degree in computer science in 1970-71 was 14%. This rose to 37% in 1983-84 but gradually declined to 18% in 2010-11.

Source: Why girls are put off studying computer science

Writing for an academic journal: 10 tips | Higher Education Network | The Guardian

The Journal of Academic Librarianship
The Journal of Academic Librarianship (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What seems like common sense isn’t common practice, says Rowena Murray who shares her top tips for getting published

Source: Writing for an academic journal: 10 tips | Higher Education Network | The Guardian

Windows Azure for Research on LinkedIn & Twitter – MSDN UK Team blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

English: Cloud Computing Image
English: Cloud Computing Image (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Announcing the  Windows Azure for Research LinkedIn discussion group!

The group will serve as an opportunity to connect and engage with researchers and domain experts to drive awareness of Microsoft Research and Windows Azure for Research. We’d like for you to be part of the community and discussions.

What is the  Windows Azure for Research initiative?

This is a program designed to help the research community use cloud computing to handle the challenges of data-intensive science. The culmination of more than three years of experimentation with using Windows Azure for scientific research, the Windows Azure for Research Initiative will help scientists accelerate the speed and dissemination of scientific discoveries.

via Windows Azure for Research on LinkedIn & Twitter – MSDN UK Team blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs.