Dan Ariely’s MOOC, “A Beginner’s Guide to Irrational Behavior,” Starts Monday | Open Culture

Dan Ariely speaking at TED
Dan Ariely speaking at TED (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Back in November we gave you a heads up on A Beginner’s Guide to Irrational Behavior, a MOOC being created by Dan Ariely. If you’re a frequent visitor to our site, you know that Ariely is a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University, who has previously explained by why well-intentioned people lie, and why CEOs repeatedly get outsized bonuses that have no basis in rationality. Ariely’s six-week course finally begins tomorrow (Monday the 25th), so, before you miss the boat, reserve your free seat today.

A Beginner’s Guide to Irrational Behavior now appears on our  list of 300 Free MOOCs from Great Universities.

via Dan Ariely’s MOOC, “A Beginner’s Guide to Irrational Behavior,” Starts Monday | Open Culture.

Dan Ariely is one of the best scientists writing today. This would be a great course to sign up to.

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‘Our School Would Be Better Off Without iPads.’ | Edudemic

English: iPads can be a distraction to learning
English: iPads can be a distraction to learning (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We go on and on about iPads, tablets, phablets, and just about every other piece of technology out there. But the discussion is slowly changing. It’s becoming less and less about how to deploy as much technology as possible. Instead, the discussion is shifting (luckily) back over to effectively connecting with students. Check out the recent post by George Couros to see what I’m talking about. It’s easy to see that there is a slow pivot happening in education right now where we’re becoming a little less enamored by shiny new iGadgets and other tech tools. Instead, we want to figure out how to effectively use what we have in order to actually connect with students.

So that’s why it was interesting to see a comment pop up on a recent post here on Edudemic about iPads. In that post, someone who wrote as ‘student 21′ pointed out the problem of deploying iPads in school. They’re not always effectively used. This goes for iPads as much as any other learning resource (electronic or not). It’s all in how the device is used.

via ‘Our School Would Be Better Off Without iPads.’ | Edudemic.

Read the original article for the details.